MedStar Authors catalog › Details for: Nonmedically indicated induction in morbidly obese women is not associated with an increased risk of cesarean delivery.
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Nonmedically indicated induction in morbidly obese women is not associated with an increased risk of cesarean delivery.

by Kawakita, Tetsuya; Iqbal, Sara N; Reddy, Uma M; Huang, Chun Chih.
Citation: American Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology. , 2017 May 31; American Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology. 217(4):451.e1-451.e8, 2017 Oct.Published: 2017ISSN: 0002-9378.Full author list: Kawakita T; Iqbal SN; Huang CC; Reddy UM.UI/PMID: 28578171.Subject(s): Adult | *Cesarean Section/sn [Statistics & Numerical Data] | Cohort Studies | Female | Fetal Macrosomia/ep [Epidemiology] | Humans | Infant, Newborn | Intensive Care Units, Neonatal | *Labor, Induced | *Obesity, Morbid/ep [Epidemiology] | Parity | Patient Admission/sn [Statistics & Numerical Data] | Pregnancy | Retrospective Studies | United States/ep [Epidemiology] | Young AdultInstitution(s): MedStar Washington Hospital Center | MedStar Health Research InstituteDepartment(s): Obstetrics and Gynecology, Maternal-Fetal MedicineActivity type: Journal Article.Medline article type(s): Journal ArticleDigital Object Identifier: https://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ajog.2017.05.048 (Click here) Abbreviated citation: Am J Obstet Gynecol. 217(4):451.e1-451.e8, 2017 Oct.Local Holdings: Available online from MWHC library: 1995 - present, Available in print through MWHC library: 1999 - 2006.Abstract: BACKGROUND: The prevalence of morbid obesity (body mass index >=40 kg/m<sup>2</sup>) in women aged 20-39 years was 7.5% in 2009 through 2010. Morbid obesity is associated with an increased risk of stillbirth compared with normal body mass index, especially >39 weeks' gestation. The data regarding increased risk of cesarean delivery associated with nonmedically indicated induction of labor compared to expectant management in morbidly obese women are limited.Abstract: OBJECTIVE: We sought to compare the cesarean delivery rate of nonmedically indicated induction of labor with expectant management in morbidly obese women without other comorbidity.Abstract: STUDY DESIGN: This was a retrospective cohort study from the Consortium on Safe Labor of morbidly obese women with singleton, cephalic gestations without previous cesarean, chronic hypertension, or gestational or pregestational diabetes between 37 0/7 and 41 6/7 weeks' gestation. We examined maternal outcomes including cesarean delivery, operative delivery, third- or fourth-degree laceration, postpartum hemorrhage, and composite maternal outcome (any of: transfusion, intensive care unit admission, venous thromboembolism). We also examined neonatal outcomes including shoulder dystocia, macrosomia (>4000 g), neonatal intensive care unit admission, and composite neonatal outcome (5-min Apgar score <5, stillbirth, neonatal death, or asphyxia or hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy). Adjusted odds ratios with 95% confidence intervals were calculated, controlling for maternal characteristics, hospital type, and simplified Bishop score. Analyses were conducted at early and full term (37 0/7 to 38 6/7 and 39 0/7 to 40 6/7 weeks' gestation, respectively). Women who delivered between 41 0/7 and 41 6/7 weeks' gestation were included as expectant management group.Abstract: RESULTS: Of 1894 nulliparous and 2455 multiparous morbidly obese women, 429 (22.7%) and 791 (32.2%) had nonmedically indicated induction, respectively. In nulliparas, nonmedically indicated induction was not associated with increased risks of cesarean delivery and was associated with decreased risks of macrosomia (2.2% vs 11.0%; adjusted odds ratio, 0.24; 95% confidence interval, 0.05-0.70) at early term and decreased neonatal intensive care unit admission (5.1% vs 8.9%; adjusted odds ratio, 0.59; 95% confidence interval, 0.33-0.98) at full term compared with expectant management. In multiparas, nonmedically indicated induction compared with expectant management was associated with a decreased risk of macrosomia at early term (4.2% vs 14.3%; adjusted odds ratio, 0.30; 95% confidence interval, 0.13-0.60), cesarean delivery at full term (5.4% vs 7.9%; adjusted odds ratio, 0.64; 95% confidence interval, 0.41-0.98), and composite neonatal outcome (0% vs 0.6%; adjusted odds ratio, 0.10; 95% confidence interval, <.01-0.89) at full term.Abstract: CONCLUSION: In morbidly obese women without other comorbidity, nonmedically indicated induction was not associated with an increased risk of cesarean delivery.Abstract: Copyright 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

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