MedStar Authors catalog › Details for: The Association of Arsenic Exposure and Arsenic Metabolism with the Metabolic Syndrome and its Individual Components: Prospective Evidence from the Strong Heart Family Study.
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The Association of Arsenic Exposure and Arsenic Metabolism with the Metabolic Syndrome and its Individual Components: Prospective Evidence from the Strong Heart Family Study.

by Umans, Jason G; Howard, Barbara V.
Citation: American Journal of Epidemiology. 2018 Mar 15.Journal: American journal of epidemiology.Published: 2018ISSN: 0002-9262.Full author list: Spratlen MJ; Grau-Perez M; Best LG; Yracheta J; Lazo M; Vaidya D; Balakrishnan P; Gamble MV; Francesconi KA; Goessler W; Cole SA; Umans JG; Howard BV; Navas-Acien A.UI/PMID: 29554222.Subject(s): IN PROCESS -- NOT YET INDEXEDInstitution(s): MedStar Health Research InstituteActivity type: Journal Article.Medline article type(s): Journal ArticleOnline resources: Click here to access online Digital Object Identifier: https://dx.doi.org/10.1093/aje/kwy048 (Click here) Abbreviated citation: Am J Epidemiol. 2018 Mar 15.Local Holdings: Available online from MWHC library: 1996 - present, Available in print through MWHC library: 1996 - 2006.Abstract: Inorganic arsenic exposure is ubiquitous and both exposure and inter-individual differences in its metabolism have been associated with cardiometabolic risk. The association between arsenic exposure and arsenic metabolism with metabolic syndrome and its individual components, however, is relatively unknown. We used poisson regression with robust variance to evaluate the association between baseline arsenic exposure (urine arsenic levels) and metabolism (relative percentage of arsenic species over their sum) with incident metabolic syndrome and its individual components (elevated waist circumference, elevated triglycerides, reduced HDL, hypertension, elevated fasting plasma glucose) in 1,047 participants from the Strong Heart Family Study, a prospective family-based cohort in American Indian communities (baseline visits in 1998-1999 and 2001-2003, follow-up visits in 2001-2003 and 2006-2009). 32% of participants developed metabolic syndrome over follow-up. An IQR increase in arsenic exposure was associated with 1.19 (95% CI: 1.01, 1.41) greater risk for elevated fasting plasma glucose but not with other individual components or overall metabolic syndrome. Arsenic metabolism, specifically lower MMA% and higher DMA% was associated with higher risk of overall metabolic syndrome and elevated waist circumference, but not with any other component. These findings support there is a contrasting and independent association between arsenic exposure and arsenic metabolism with metabolic outcomes which may contribute to overall diabetes risk.

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