MedStar Authors catalog › Details for: Survival from a 75% TBSA thermal injury complicated by bowel ischemia presenting with pneumatosis intestinalis.
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Survival from a 75% TBSA thermal injury complicated by bowel ischemia presenting with pneumatosis intestinalis.

by Caso, Raul; Barrak, Dany; Travis, Taryn E; Johnson, Laura; Shupp, Jeffrey W.
Citation: Journal of Surgical Case Reports. 2018(8):rjy235, 2018 Aug..Journal: Journal of surgical case reports.Published: ; 2018ISSN: 2042-8812.Full author list: Caso R; Barrak D; Travis TE; Johnson LS; Shupp JW.UI/PMID: 30181865.Subject(s): IN PROCESS -- NOT YET INDEXEDInstitution(s): MedStar Washington Hospital Center | MedStar Health Research InstituteDepartment(s): Surgery/General Surgery | Surgery/Burn Services | Firefighters' Burn and Surgical Research LaboratoryActivity type: Journal Article.Medline article type(s): Journal ArticleOnline resources: Click here to access online Digital Object Identifier: https://dx.doi.org/10.1093/jscr/rjy235 (Click here) Abbreviated citation: J. surg. case rep.. 2018(8):rjy235, 2018 Aug.Abstract: Thermal injury is associated with an increased risk of abdominal complications such as ischemia, infarction and pneumatosis intestinalis (PI). PI is characterized by gas in the intestinal wall and, when diagnosed it can signify the presence of a life-threatening condition. We present a case of a patient who survived 75% total body surface area burns complicated by ischemic bowel that initially presented as extensive PI. This patient was emergently taken to the operating room and underwent a subtotal colectomy and small bowel resection for ischemic bowel. Prompt diagnosis and successful management of the underlying condition ultimately contributed to the patient's survival. The presence of peritonitis or abdominal distension, portomesenteric venous gas and lactic acidosis should prompt immediate surgical intervention in the post-burn period.

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