MedStar Authors catalog › Details for: Relation of Sex and Race to Outcomes in Patients Undergoing Percutaneous Intervention With Drug-Eluting Stents.
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Relation of Sex and Race to Outcomes in Patients Undergoing Percutaneous Intervention With Drug-Eluting Stents.

by Iantorno, Micaela; Torguson, Rebecca; Kolm, Paul; Gajanana, Deepakraj; Suddath, William O; Rogers, Toby; Bernardo, Nelson L; Ben-Dor, Itsik; Gai, Jiaxiang; Satler, Lowell F; Garcia-Garcia, Hector M; Weintraub, William S; Waksman, Ron.
Citation: American Journal of Cardiology. 2018 Dec 19.Journal: The American journal of cardiology.Published: ; 2018ISSN: 0002-9149.Full author list: Iantorno M; Torguson R; Kolm P; Gajanana D; Suddath WO; Rogers T; Bernardo NL; Ben-Dor I; Gai J; Satler LF; Garcia-Garcia HM; Weintraub WS; Waksman R.UI/PMID: 30595392.Subject(s): IN PROCESS -- NOT YET INDEXEDInstitution(s): MedStar Heart & Vascular InstituteActivity type: Journal Article.Medline article type(s): Journal ArticleDigital Object Identifier: https://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.amjcard.2018.12.021 (Click here) Abbreviated citation: Am J Cardiol. 2018 Dec 19.Local Holdings: Available online from MWHC library: 1995 - present, Available in print through MWHC library: 1999 - 2006.Abstract: Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death in men and women, black and white. However, there exists limited outcomes data for women and blacks after percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). The aim of this study was to evaluate the 1-year major cardiovascular events in patients who underwent PCI based on gender and race. We retrospectively analyzed data that were prospectively collected over 13 years at a large tertiary hospital in the United States. There were 12,050 patients who underwent PCI for both stable disease and acute coronary syndrome from 2003 to 2016. Of those, 1,952 were black men, 6,013 white men, 1,619 black women, and 2,466 white women. Major cardiovascular events at 1 year were assessed, and proportional Cox hazard model analyses were performed to assess outcome adjusted for confounding factors (i.e., age, body mass index, presentation with acute myocardial infarction, diabetes, smoking, history of coronary artery disease, family history of coronary artery disease, hyperlipidemia, hypertension, previous cardiovascular intervention, and chronic kidney disease). At 1 year, white men had significantly lower major cardiovascular events driven by lower rate of death compared with the other groups. Adjusted for confounders, major cardiovascular events were 1.3 to 1.5 times more likely to occur in black men and women and white women than in white men. There was a significant race by gender interaction (p <0.001).Abstract: Copyright (c) 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

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