MedStar Authors catalog › Details for: Anaphylaxis to scorpion antivenin and its management following envenomation by Indian red scorpion, Mesobuthus tamulus.
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Anaphylaxis to scorpion antivenin and its management following envenomation by Indian red scorpion, Mesobuthus tamulus.

by Bhoite, Girija Ramesh.
Citation: Indian Journal of Critical Care Medicine. 19(9):547-9, 2015 Sep..Journal: Indian journal of critical care medicine : peer-reviewed, official publication of Indian Society of Critical Care Medicine.Published: ; 2015ISSN: 0972-5229.Full author list: Bhoite RR; Bhoite GR; Bagdure DN; Bawaskar HS.UI/PMID: 26430342.Subject(s): IN PROCESS -- NOT YET INDEXEDInstitution(s): MedStar Heart & Vascular InstituteActivity type: Journal Article.Medline article type(s): Case ReportsOnline resources: Click here to access online Digital Object Identifier: https://dx.doi.org/10.4103/0972-5229.164807 (Click here) Abbreviated citation: Indian J. Crit. Care Med.. 19(9):547-9, 2015 Sep.Abstract: Mesobuthus tamulus is an Indian red scorpion that is responsible for numerous cases of scorpion stings in the Indian subcontinent. Antivenin, vasodilators, and benzodiazepines are medications of choice in the treatment of scorpion bites. Adverse reactions such as anaphylaxis to antivenin have been infrequently described in the literature. We, herein, present a case of a 42-year-old man stung by Indian red scorpion while gardening at home in India, who presented with extreme pain at the sting site and signs of cardio-toxicity. He was treated with scorpion antivenin and vasodilators but developed anaphylaxis to antivenin. We discuss management strategies. Anaphylaxis to antivenin should be on the differential during management of scorpion bites because classical signs of anaphylaxis may be absent.

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