MedStar Authors catalog › Details for: The Public's Preferences on Plastic Surgery Social Media Engagement and Professionalism: Demystifying the Impact of Demographics.
Normal view MARC view ISBD view

The Public's Preferences on Plastic Surgery Social Media Engagement and Professionalism: Demystifying the Impact of Demographics.

by Fan, Kenneth L; Economides, James M; Black, Cara K.
Citation: Plastic & Reconstructive Surgery. 143(2):619-630, 2019 Feb..Journal: Plastic and reconstructive surgery.Published: ; 2019ISSN: 0032-1052.Full author list: Fan KL; Graziano F; Economides JM; Black CK; Song DH.UI/PMID: 30688911.Subject(s): IN PROCESS -- NOT YET INDEXEDInstitution(s): MedStar Washington Hospital Center | MedStar Health Research InstituteDepartment(s): Surgery/Plastic SurgeryActivity type: Journal Article.Medline article type(s): Journal ArticleDigital Object Identifier: https://dx.doi.org/10.1097/PRS.0000000000005205 (Click here) Abbreviated citation: Plast Reconstr Surg. 143(2):619-630, 2019 Feb.Abstract: BACKGROUND: Social media discussions are alive among plastic surgeons. This article represents a primer on beginning to understand how the public would seek out plastic surgeons and how demographics shape their preferences.Abstract: METHODS: An anonymous 31-question survey was crowdsourced by means of MTurk.Abstract: RESULTS: There were a total of 527 respondents. Of these respondents, 33 percent follow plastic surgeons on social media, with those aged younger than 35 years 3.9 times more likely to do so. Google was the first place people would look for a plastic surgeon (46 percent). When asked what was the most influential of all online methods for selecting a surgeon, practice website ranked first (25 percent), but social media platforms ranked higher as a whole (35 percent). Those considering surgical or noninvasive procedures are thee times more likely to select social media platforms as the most influential online method in selecting a surgeon and five times more likely to follow a plastic surgeon on social media. The majority would prefer not seeing the surgeon's private life displayed on social media (39 percent). Respondents were evenly split regarding whether graphic surgical images would lead them to unfollow accounts. Ninety-six percent of the general public were unclear of the type of board certification a plastic surgeon should hold.Abstract: CONCLUSIONS: Clear differences in engagement and perception exist in the public based on age, sex, parental status, and reported country of origin. Social media will soon become a critical strategy in outreach and engagement and a valuable tool in clearing misconceptions within plastic surgery.

Powered by Koha